Dimensions of Gender Stereotypes: Positive Personality, Cognitive, Physical, and Negative Personality

                                  

Masculine

 

Feminine

Personality

Cognitive

Physical

Negative personality

 

Personality

Cognitive

Physical

Negative  personality

competitive

good with numbers

rugged

egotistical

 

affectionate

imaginative

cute

spineless c

daring

analytical

muscular

hostile

 

sympathetic

intuitive

gorgeous

gullible c

adventurous

good at  problem solving

physically strong

cynical

 

gentle

artistic

beautiful

servile c

 

aggressive

quantitatively

     skilled

burly

arrogant

 

sensitive

creative

pretty

subordinates self to others c

courageousa

good at reasoninga

physically      vigorousa

boastful

 

supportivea

expressivea

petitea

whiny d

dominanta

mathematicala

brawnya

greedy

 

kinda

tastefula

sexya

complaining d

unexcitableb

 

 

dictatorial

 

nurturingb

 

 

nagging d

stands up under pressureb

 

 

unprincipled

 

warmb

 

                       

fussy d

 

Note. Items were presented in Diekman & Eagly (2000); drawn from factor-analysis by Cejka & Eagly (1999) and the EPAQ (Spence & Helmreich, 1978). Alphas for all versions of the scales can be found in Diekman & Eagly (2000).  Typical assessment of stereotypes is to present a target individual (e.g., the average man) and ask participants to rate the likelihood that this target individuals possesses each trait on a 7-point scale, ranging from very unlikely to very likely.

 

Unmarked personality, cognitive, and physical items formed the 4-item scales.

a These items were added to form 6-item scales.                                                                      

b These items were added to form 8-item scales.

c These items comprise the unmitigated communion subscale of negative femininity (Spence, Helmreich, & Holahan, 1979; see Diekman, Goodfriend, & Goodwin, 2004, for alphas).

d These items comprise the passive aggression subscale of negative femininity (Spence, Helmreich, & Holahan, 1979; see Diekman, Goodfriend, & Goodwin, 2004, for alphas).