SOCIOMETRY IN THE CLASSROOM:

HOW TO DO IT


STEP 4


Using the data compiled in STEP 3's bar graph, as well as the total +'s and -'s found at the bottom of STEP 2's matrix, one can go on to graphically display these results using the "TARGET TECHNIQUE." APPENDIX D displays the traditional "Bull's Eye Target" template. The advantage of using this relatively simply and quick display is that one can group children into categories similar to those described above in Step 3. Each portion (ring) of the Target Graph is lettered "A" through "E" and these letters correspond to the following definitions:
FIGURE 4.

A. (POPULAR CHILDREN):


This is the "bull's eye" portion of the graph and is reserved for the most "popular" children. Popular is defined as children who have a frequency of "positive" nominations great than 3, the average number of nominations if children evenly distributed their choices over the entire class, and have near zero (0) "negative" nominations.

B. (LIKED MORE THAN DISLIKED):


Children who have more "positive" nominations than they have "negative" nominations go in Sector B.

C. (DISLIKED MORE THAN LIKED):


Children who have more "negative" nominations than they have "positive" nominations go in Sector C.

D. (CONTROVERSIAL CHILDREN):


A special kind of category called "controversial" is reserved for children who have nearly an equal number of "positive" and "negative" nominations and both exceed the average nominations if children evenly distributed their choices over the entire class.

E. (REJECTED CHILDREN):


Sector E is reserved for children who received only one or no positive nominations and their negative nominations exceed the average number of nominations if children evenly distributed their choices over the entire class.

F. NEGLECTED CHILDREN


Children who do not receive any "positive" nor any "negative" nominations should be placed in the F sector. These children are not even being acknowledged by their classmates. Nevertheless, this is useful information, but as one can see, using the "positive - negative" nomination technique tells us very little about NEGLECTED children. As we shall see later, the classroom social Distance Rating technique could give us some further insight into these individuals.




GO TO STEP 5

RETURN TO TABLE OF CONTENTS



This WWW site has been constructed by Lawrence W. Sherman. I wish to acknowledge the support of the Center for Human Development, Learning and Teaching AND the Department of Educational Psychology. Please send any comments and suggestions about this home page to Lawrence W. Sherman.




This Document was last modified on


This Document has been accessed TIMES.